Looking back over the quite-a-few years, I recall the need to always create a favicon for a website. It seemed to be one of the last things I did. It is important, but can wait.

As usual, the requirements for this aspect of a website change routinely, so it becomes necessary to research what to do as the need arises.

Happily, there are some fantastic resources to help web designers quickly create the various favicons needed for the platforms and devices that need one. I settled on one.

I have used REAL FAVICON GENERATOR for several needs recently, and gotta hand it to them. The service works great and saved me a lot of trouble. Thanks, REALFAV!

I spent numerous hours researching if a view resulting from a selection in a DropDownList could be retained after clicking to a new page. This was needed for a school website in order to select the list of classes of a particular discipline, then click on a class, go to a new page, and return to the selected class list.

I explored lots of options, but finally implemented a simple solution----

Add a javascript: function goBack() with window.history.back() as the definition of the function. Then put a button on the visited razor view page to go back to the page that has the DropDownList with onclick="goBack()" within the button tag. This is a client solution that uses the browser's cache functionality.

Previously there was a Html.ActionLink to return to the Index page. This resulted in a view of all content, not the previously selected course list.

Please comment if you like this solution, or feel it will eventually cause a dilemma.

Karl Denninger on market-ticker.org explains the technology and background of the domain name system here.

The Internet Handover Scam

Ok, folks, I've had enough of Ted Cruz and a handful of others trying to fundraise on the back of the Internet handover issue.

First, this is not a surprise nor something Obama cooked up in the dead of night. The expiration of the existing arrangement has been known for literal years and the timing of same has been known for the same amount of time. If the US Congress wanted to intervene it has had years to do so and has intentionally not done so. So to Ted Cruz and others (Jim DeMint anyone?) who is now claiming "emergency", go perform an anatomically-impossible act; if you were more-focused on policy and less on your own horse**** you would have dealt with this months or even years ago.

Second, on to the technical side: There are two rough components to Internet "governance." The first is handled through domain name registration. Originally this was all handled under government contract by a government-dished out monopoly. During that time domains were $50/year plus whatever the ISP that registered them for you and ran your DNS charged, and it often took days (instead of seconds now) to get a domain registered. These were COM/NET/ORG/MIL/GOV/EDU and the country code domains; in the US that was .US. This changed through a quite-contentious (and, IMHO, a rather cronyism and lie-laced) process into what we have now with many TLDs. I will note that the so-called cognoscenti of the time tried to claim that expanding the TLD list on a material basis was not going to work for technical reasons...

Popups are great to capture attention and present important content on desktop and tablet sites, but on the smartphone view, they can get in the way.

Various solutions to hide the popup from the mobile view have been shared. For example, Conditional CSS, and Temporary Solution to Hide Popup on Mobile Devices, and Create a Simple Responsive Popup Window with jQuery.

I recently solved my problem with this dilemma by adjusting the css on the popup.css file by adding a media call for a mobile view, and changing the selectors to hide or revise those of the divs in the main css. Though I was not able to simply wrap the code for the popup in a display:none css div, I could isolate my display:none div to wrap only the image, and without the 1. Overlay, 2. Popup and 3. Image css definitions showing on the mobile view, it is now clean and user-friendly.

"During an often-contentious hearing Wednesday, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, took on the Obama administration for what has become his latest signature issue: internet oversight.

"The Obama administration is due to relinquish U.S. control Oct. 1 over a private-sector, nonprofit organization that administers internet domain names and designations. Cruz warned that the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers will not on its own honor U.S. protections of free speech, and he is leading an effort to delay or stop the transfer..."

Read more

"On October 1st, the US Government's National Telecommunications and Information Administration will hand over control of the internet's domain name system to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), a 'multi-stakeholder' nonprofit organization. While the change will be invisible to the billions of internet users out there, starting in October, the US government will no longer control what some call the internet's 'phone book.'"

... "Again, regular users won't notice a difference in their internet come October, but the switch isn't without controversy."; More about the internet transfer

Chatbots are in the news. Should you invest in this prospect? What is a chatbot?

“Chatbots have the power to personalize a business, give customers a more intimate experience and build consumer loyalty by giving a phone menu or website store a pleasant, responsive, human personality. They may eventually take the place of customer-service people, store clerks and even psychotherapists as computer speeds and artificial intelligence evolve.”

Find out more here and here.

True or False?

  1. Outdoor advertising is an excellent medium for targeting affluent consumers.
  2. Advertising on the Internet is the closest technique to personal selling.
  3. Using an animal as a "model" in a print ad enhances its memorability.
  4. Newspaper is a great medium for image campaigns.
  5. Among TV, radio, newspaper and magazine, the shortest elapsed time between ad exposure and the day's biggest purchase is with TV.
  6. Magazines help advertisers relate intangibles such as quality and prestige.
  7. Trade publications are a good buy for pretrade show ads to build attendance at your exhibit.
  8. Frequency (sending a message a certain number of times) is essential for effective media advertising and for direct mail.

Answers:

  1. True.
  2. False. TV advertising is. However, as the Internet becomes even more interactive with realtime video and audio clips, it will be.
  3. True.
  4. False. Use it instead to announce sales, new shipments, etc.
  5. False. It's with radio.
  6. True.
  7. True.
  8. Generally true.