To achieve share of mind in the midst of media clutter and busy lifestyles, every ad or promotional piece must grab attention and be remembered. How? Claiming even a tiny territory in the average person's mind is the military equivalent of establishing a U.S. outpost in enemy territory.

Luckily, there are certain tricks of the marketing trade related to the human love of word play. From the simple rhyme or alliteration to the more complex forms such as acronyms and onomatopes--words that suggest the sound associated with their meaning such as buzz or gag-- nearly all people enjoy alphabetic acrobatics.

The made-up word is one trick that can provoke attention and memorability. An example of a coined company name is Kodak. Kodak’s founder, George Eastman, set the following criteria for his trademark before inventing it: 1. a short word that meant nothing, 2. that could not be easily misspelled, and 3. that had strong aural impact. Today, Kodak is still a premier name in its field.*

Of course, made-up names need not be meaningless. New words range in familiarity from their suggestive natures to actual use of known words. Kleenex is associated with the word clean which suggests what to do with the product. Minutemaid combines two familiar words and suggests the length of time needed to prepare the product.

Any made up-word can be memorable if set to music, as proven by supercalifragilisticexpeali- docious. But not every company utilizes radio or TV to take advantage of the benefits offered through musical jingles. Be advised, though, that these benefits are so invaluable that you should consider a jingle for your firm videoor webpage.

Not every situation lends itself to word invention, but before formally introducing your new venture or promotion, ask yourself or your marketing consultant: Could this product or event gain notoriety by naming it with a new word? Would an imaginative name help to differentiate it and sell it?

*From The Name's The Thing by Henri Carmasson, AMACOM. 1988.

©2001. DAY Communications/fastzone.com. All rights reserved.

steer

Profit By An Image Upgrade!

You know your products or services are unique-- and better than the competition's. But how can you convey that to today's sophisticated consumers and prospects in today's saturated marketplace? One way is to add a service mark (SM) to your company, name or service, or to update your product's trademark (TM).

A TM is a word, symbol, design or any combination of those elements, a slogan or even a distinctive sound which identifies and distinguishes your goods from those of other firms. When it identifies a service it is called a service mark. TM's and SM's not only differentiate products or services, they promote and sell them. They provoke thought, evoke a mental image, or insure memorability through rhyme, alliteration, symbols or pictures, which helps to increase sales or billings. One of the deans of advertising, David Ogilvy, considered a product's brand mark-- the symbol, color or design aspect of its trademark to be a first-class ticket through life.

"Just do it", "Melts in your mouth, not in your hand",  "Membership has its privileges"....A Quaker man, a girl with an umbrella and box of salt, Aunt Jemimah...You know the companies, and their trademarks make you feel good about their products and services.

But TM's and SM's are not just for megacompanies. They're for any business seeking to win more business. Why not update your product's label with a new brand mark? Or, if you offer a line of services, consider giving them promotional names to enhance their appeal.

If yours is a service firm, boost your image with a slogan that shows up on your stationery, capabilities brochure, ads and specialty items. It's a good way to let people know you're growing, changing and innovating. Call us today for creative assistance with an image upgrade.

Little known facts about trademark registration

Federal registration is not necessary for trademark protection, but does provide the right to sue in Federal court for infringements. Many trademarks currently in use are simply protected by state and common law. We do, however, recommend a simple trademark search before publishing or applying a mark, even if registration seems unnecessary.

Before November 16, 1995, a trademark owner could file an application for a Federal registration only if the mark was in use on goods which were shipped or sold, or on services that were rendered, in commerce which could be controlled by Congress. After that date, the law changed, and intent to use is now the requirement for registering a trademark.

Prior to registration, many trademark owners use a TM or SM symbol to indicate a claim of ownership, even if no Federal trademark application is pending. The fee is approximately $300 for each class of goods or services for which application is made, plus legal services fees to verify the originality of the mark.

Please call on us for assistance with a trademark or service mark or for referrals to trademark attorneys.

©2001. DAY Communications/fastzone.com. All rights reserved.

Color talks

Your company colors communicate. Ideally, they add suggestive and symbolic connotations to your name and logo, accentuate them, and make them more perceptible, easier to identify. Ideally, they evoke a positive response and feeling in your customers and prospects. How are your colors performing?

We all instinctively recognize that colors symbolize concepts, and even the least artistically inclined among us would know not to use bright red on a nursing home letterhead or light blue for a trial attorney. But how does one determine the right colors for a new company or for a firm seeking to update its image? How will you determine the best selection of colors for your firm brochure? Consult with us. We'll help you be original without straying from the ground rules of good taste.

Times change. Architectural styles evolve, fashions are updated, and so are the colors of business. Rapid technological change and the trend of our society toward a service economy have made fresh colors and new color combinations the rule rather than the exception, because they have the power to tell the story.

Also, colors can help you achieve various communications objectives. For example, dull colors help to reduce tension. Add gray to a vivid color to get a dull one. Or, keep that vivid color if you want people to pay attention.

Want to show you are unique? Use an eccentric color like fuchsia, or introduce an unusual color combination such as burgundy with peach rather than gray or navy as is usually seen.

The ink companies always keep pace with the times by creating new colors for graphic designers. The Internet boasts thousands of colors! We're sure there’s a new color especially for your firm.

Of course, changing colors will affect nearly all the items which identify your firm to its publics. However, as with all professional advertising, it is a justifiable operating expense, and an investment which may spur new inquiries and growth. Contact us to profit by new colors.